Ocucon https://ocucon.com See everything know everything Wed, 12 Feb 2020 14:36:07 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 Slips, Trips and Falls in the Retail Sector: Reducing the Risk https://ocucon.com/slips-trips-and-falls-in-the-retail-sector/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=slips-trips-and-falls-in-the-retail-sector https://ocucon.com/slips-trips-and-falls-in-the-retail-sector/#respond Mon, 10 Feb 2020 14:32:13 +0000 https://ocucon.com/?p=2426 Did you know that nearly 50% of all claims made against retailers are slips, trips and falls cases? (source). It’s also important to be aware that slips, trips and falls are the second highest single cause of workplace injuries (source).  If a slip and fall accident occurs in your place of business, it can [...]

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Did you know that nearly 50% of all claims made against retailers are slips, trips and falls cases? (source). It’s also important to be aware that slips, trips and falls are the second highest single cause of workplace injuries (source). 

If a slip and fall accident occurs in your place of business, it can be difficult to defend your operations if due diligence has not been carried out in providing a safe environment for customers and employees. In order to effectively protect employees and customers, slip and fall prevention must be viewed holistically and a full risk assessment should be carried out. 

Compiling such a Risk Assessment should follow 6 steps;

Identify Risks

Begin by analysing previous slips to identify any particular issues. This involves identifying areas where slips, trips, and falls have happened and where they are more likely to happen. Consult with staff to find out if they are aware of any problems or if they have slipped in the past.

Then, identify all sources of liquid, for example; equipment using water/ liquid, cleaning store, toilets, loose fruit and vegetables, flowers and plants, etc. It’s important to know that viscous liquid spills can be highly hazardous. This is because as the viscosity of a likely spill increases, the surface roughness required increases. 

Prevent

A number of steps should be taken to prevent slips, trips, and falls caused by spills. The following should all be considered as part of your risk management strategy;

– Use floor mats near liquid containers

– Provide containers for customers to carry their goods

– Maintain equipment and pipework in good working order with proper seals and valves

– Dispose of packing material and other wrappings carefully. Merchandising material & paper/ magazine inserts can be hazardous

– Display any store liquids so it’s not likely to spill onto walkways. Don’t put containers of liquid too close to the front of shelves

– Invest in a software tool which alerts management as soon as hazardous material spills/ appears on the floor. Alerts should be set up to automatically send a notification in such an event.

Contain

In 2012, 35% of workplace visits by the Health and Safety Authority found that the employer didn’t have a procedure in place for the use of floor mats to reduce slip risks. It’s important that measures are taken to contain spills – these include;

– Use floor mats where appropriate

– Where spills are likely, provide tools designed to contain spills

– Provide drains in areas where spills are a frequent occurrence

– Hang mops and other wet equipment over buckets

– Exercise particular caution at entrances and exits 

Detect

Your business should be monitoring spill detection on a frequent, regular, and planned basis. Use a checklist to ensure monitoring of spills is carried out. 

Keep in mind that often, measures taken to bring awareness to a spill are generally not reliable. This is because the visibility of a fluid is dependent on numerous factors.

Actions which may increase the visibility of a fluid spill on a floor include:

  • Increase ambient lighting, especially around entrances and exits
  • Cordon off or place markers at the edges of a wet area
  • Ensure colour contrast between flooring and likely fluid contaminants, such as cleaning products
  • Use AI technology to identify hazardous spills as soon as they occur

Cordon

Ensure that spills are immediately removed using absorbent material. 

In some instances, it may not be possible to remove a spill straight away, for example, large spills, spills of viscous or hazardous liquids. In such circumstances, it may be necessary to cordon off the spill using signs or markers.

Remove

Spills should be dealt with immediately. To be proactive, provide cleaning materials to remove spills at identified high risk areas. Ensure spills are thoroughly cleaned and dried. Often, a superficial effort made to clean or dry the surface can cause a greater risk than that of the original spill. 

Emerging technology that detects hazards such as liquid spills as soon as they occur can significantly reduce risk. It is predicted that this innovative technology will be commercially available this year and will greatly improve retail operations.

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Opportunities in VSaaS for Loss Prevention https://ocucon.com/opportunities-in-vsaas-for-loss-prevention/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=opportunities-in-vsaas-for-loss-prevention https://ocucon.com/opportunities-in-vsaas-for-loss-prevention/#respond Thu, 30 Jan 2020 09:52:42 +0000 https://ocucon.com/?p=2421 This post will detail how video surveillance as a service, or VSaaS, is an innovative solution to the challenges that Loss Prevention professionals face.  Current Challenges The Loss Prevention team is an integral part of any business. Loss prevention leaders face numerous challenges in all aspects of the job. In the past, the average [...]

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This post will detail how video surveillance as a service, or VSaaS, is an innovative solution to the challenges that Loss Prevention professionals face. 

Current Challenges

The Loss Prevention team is an integral part of any business. Loss prevention leaders face numerous challenges in all aspects of the job. In the past, the average LP leader focused almost entirely on shrink, safety, and physical security. However, risks have changed and LP professionals must address challenges that span the entire business. New high-level risks such as terrorism, evolved physical security threats, fraud, and the theft of proprietary information are now often considered the responsibility of the Loss Prevention team.  

Loss Prevention professionals are often responsible for the organisation’s surveillance technology in order to deter crime and promote safety.  When tasked with retrieving video from for example, LP teams find it tedious, requiring endless searching to find the required footage. Sharing and archiving footage is often cumbersome, wasting technical and management resources. Loss prevention leaders are busy; they’re pressed for the time it takes to thoroughly analyse and test solutions. And of course, there are constant budgetary pressures. Furthermore, as technology is constantly evolving, it is important to continuously adjust.

What is VSaaS?

Video Surveillance as a Service (VSaaS) provides on demand network access to surveillance data. This data can then be quickly obtained and easily released with little service provider interaction or management effort. For the end user, the process is as follows; an on-site camera records the audio/video data, transmits it using an internet connection to the cloud, and the Video Management Software (VMS) delivers the footage on-demand to the end-user/client. 

VSaaS was one of the first applications of cloud technology as it offers unparalleled benefits in cost, ease of implementation, maintenance, usage, scaling, and security. The best VSaaS providers offer open integration and low cost scalability. Such providers are built upon a price effective business model and are constantly evolving their technology. 

The market for VSaaS is growing quickly; the value of the global VSaaS market is expected to reach £1.5 billion in 2020. The two driving factors of this market are due to the rising installation of surveillance technology for security purposes and the growing demand for IP cameras due to reduced cost and superior functionality. I’ve personally witnessed the increase in demand for this technology in the commercial vertical due to Loss Prevention teams’ desire to enhance security, reduce theft, and gather data in order to take a long-term view of risk. 

Opportunities

It’s important to first carry out a well-reasoned, thoroughly researched financial justification for introducing new surveillance technology. This will promote “buy-in” for the project, and helps the LP team make the case to senior management. 

Intelligent video services and analytics

VSaaS providers are continuously looking for ways to innovate. Many VSaaS solutions include Intelligent Video Analytics which provides LP teams with crucial data such as; audio detection, defocusing detection, face detection, fog detection, intrusion, loitering, motion detection, sound classification including; explosion, glass break, gunshot, scream, tampering detection, and virtual line crossing. 

Storage on EDGE technology

Edge storage makes it possible for surveillance video recording to be flexible and reliable, ensures bandwidth usage is optimised, and lowers the cost for remote site recording. This technology offers remote site recording that is affordable wherever bandwidth is either absent or limited. Edge storage offers fail-over recording, meaning that in the case of a network failure, images can be temporarily stored on the camera’s SD card. 

Mobile Access

VSaaS is managed in the cloud, therefore users benefit from the ability to access data from anywhere at anytime via their desktop, laptop, or mobile device. This is beneficial to LP teams as they are frequently on the move, and this feature allows connected remote working that is secure. 

Fraud Prevention and Asset Protection

Fraudulent slips, trips, and falls claims cost UK businesses more than half a billion a year. It is estimated that many organisations are losing around five per cent of their annual revenue to fraud.

Audit tracking, litigation and fraudulent claims have resulted in an increased requirement for businesses to store and retrieve security footage over longer periods of time. This is in order to help effectively defend against wrongful allegations.

Making an investment in upgrading your surveillance technology could realistically achieve ROI within a year through better prevention of theft and fraudulent claims in addition to improved operational oversight. Technological advances in digital IP video cameras and recorders has resulted in captured images are clearer, no matter what the lighting conditions are. 

A VSaaS provider will work with you to ensure video data is easily retrievable, ensuring collection of surveillance video evidence doesn’t take up extra time or resources. This also enables your team to ensure the swift collection of compensation when any store property is damaged or stolen. Your team will be able to work from anywhere, as storing data in the cloud will allow them to efficiently monitor any store location from anywhere with an internet connection. 

Choosing a VSaaS Provider

When selecting a VSaaS provider, it’s advised to choose a provider that goes beyond simply submitting a standardised proposal. The best client/provider relationship is typically one where the provider can create a bespoke commercial solution that reflects the client’s unique requirements and challenges. Look for a provider that will first gain a deep understanding of the unique nature of your challenges. They should then explore how their solution can add value to your bottom line.

If your business deals with any amount of fraudulent claims or wrongful allegations, explore solutions that provide the flexibility to store uncapped amounts of data for as long as required. This revolutionises the way in which businesses defend against fraud. It will allow for greater post-recording video analytics that will ultimately generate significant security and business insights.

A VSaaS solution should be hassle-free. Look for a completely turnkey solution; the provider should liaise with your incumbent IT and communications suppliers, and provision and manage new internet connectivity. The solution should be completely off network – not interfering with any of your existing CCTV hardware. The right provider should be willing to work with open systems – they won’t be tied to a particular brand and will be happy to recommend best-in-class products and services. 

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Do you Need to Carry out a Privacy Impact Assessment for your Surveillance System? https://ocucon.com/privacy-impact-assessment-surveillance-systems/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=privacy-impact-assessment-surveillance-systems https://ocucon.com/privacy-impact-assessment-surveillance-systems/#respond Thu, 23 Jan 2020 09:59:49 +0000 https://ocucon.com/?p=2394 The Surveillance Camera Code of Practice Principle 2 states that; “The use of a surveillance camera system must take into account its effect on individuals and their privacy, with regular reviews to ensure its use remains justified” (source). The best way to ensure compliance with Principle 2? Conduct a Privacy Impact Assessment(PIA). The one [...]

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The Surveillance Camera Code of Practice Principle 2 states that; “The use of a surveillance camera system must take into account its effect on individuals and their privacy, with regular reviews to ensure its use remains justified” (source).

The best way to ensure compliance with Principle 2? Conduct a Privacy Impact Assessment(PIA). The one provided by the Surveillance Camera Commissioner (available here ) should serve as your primary resource. Conducting a PIA allows surveillance systems operators to dissect risks to compliance with GDPR and the ICO CCTV code of practice.

A PIA should take into account the purpose for such a system and the impact that recording may have on an individual’s privacy. Decide whether the proposed system can be justified as proportionate to the reason it is required. Read on to find out if you need to conduct such an assessment….

Should I Conduct a Privacy Impact Assessment?

The Surveillance Camera Commission recommends that a privacy impact assessment is carried out when any of the following apply:

Cameras are added or removed from systems

  • When conducting a review of your system to ensure that it is justified (in accordance with Principle 10 of the Surveillance Camera Code of Practice and with the ICO CCTV code of practice). It is recommended that businesses conduct this review once a year.

Cameras are moved or change position

  • When you are changing the location or field of view of a camera or any such similar changes
  • When you increase the area captured by your surveillance camera systems

Whole or parts of systems are upgraded

  • The activity or change will engage heightened privacy concerns such as voice recording and biometric recognition such as facial and gait recognition
  • When you change the way in which the recorded images and information is handled, used, or disclosed.
  • If you are considering the capture of an additional identifier such as vehicle registration mark to enable automatic number plate recognition (ANPR).

New systems are installed

  • Considering introducing new or additional technology that may affect privacy (for example body worn cameras, drones, or multi sensor extremely high resolution cameras)
  • If your system involves any form of cross referencing to other collections of personal information
  • If your system involves more than one company or agency undertaking activities either on your behalf or in their own right
  • When you change or add an end user or recipient for the recorded information or information derived from it

In summary; if in doubt over whether to conduct a PIA, consider the nature and scope of the surveillance camera activities and the potential to impact upon an individual’s privacy.

Scroll down to view the checklist we created and right click to save so that you can use this checklist for your own business!

PIA cctv

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Efficiently Handling Injury Claims https://ocucon.com/cctv-and-personal-injury-claims/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=cctv-and-personal-injury-claims https://ocucon.com/cctv-and-personal-injury-claims/#respond Thu, 23 Jan 2020 09:51:01 +0000 https://ocucon.com/?p=2374 What is a Personal Injury Claim? The term “Slip and fall" is used for a personal injury case in which a person slips or trips and falls, and is then injured on someone else's property, or premises. These cases usually fall under an umbrella of cases known as "premises liability" claims. There is no [...]

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What is a Personal Injury Claim?

The term “Slip and fall” is used for a personal injury case in which a person slips or trips and falls, and is then injured on someone else’s property, or premises. These cases usually fall under an umbrella of cases known as “premises liability” claims.

There is no one method of determining when or if a business owner is legally responsible for a customer’s injuries in a slip and fall accident. Legal guidance offers the following two considerations made in such cases: 1. whether the business/property owner acted carefully so that slipping/tripping was unlikely to happen, and 2. whether the customer was careless in not seeing/avoiding the scenario that caused their fall.

These slip, trip and fall events can have significant financial impact to a business. Claim costs are rising due to litigation and fraud, and soaring medical/rehabilitation costs.

How Business Owners Can Mitigate Risks

To help prevent slips, trips, and falls, business owners/managers must understand the causes, identify areas where improvements could be made, and implement action plans to mitigate the risks.

If an incident does occur, the management team must be prepared to mitigate loss by responding quickly, ensuring that employees know the action plan, following up with the injured person after the incident, and determining the initial cause of the event to prevent similar occurrences. It’s also important to keep in mind other responsibilities such as; promoting claim management by reporting claims as soon as possible and notifying the insurance carrier if any fraud is suspected.

CCTV evidence is crucial in helping defend or reduce liability. CCTV footage aids in establishing the facts around a reported incident, such as;

– If the claimant has given an accurate description of how the accident occurred
– If the injury is consistent with the way the accident unfolded
– Whether the incident actually took place

When a Claim is Submitted, What is the Best Way to Handle it?

Being proactive is the best way to handle these claims. Quick and efficient handling of claims is important because it saves legal costs.

Cloud by Ocucon customers are able to proactively handle such claims. This is because Ocucon offers unlimited storage for an unlimited number of cameras, so users can easily obtain footage from any incident.

The amount of surveillance footage an organisation can save has been limited by physical servers and the sheer scale and size of data. Currently, data is typically only stored for 30 days. Uncapped storage of video surveillance data reduces the need to delete archived footage to make space for new incoming footage. The unnecessary deletion of information may later become a vital piece of evidence.

Cloud by Ocucon offers:

Free, no obligation on-site audit
Fast and efficient set up and installation
Unlimited cameras – no limit to the number of cameras that can be supported
Unlimited locations – access to Cloud platform enables unlimited number of locations
Hardware provided – Ocucon provides all hardware required, including a state of the art server
Managed updates – Ocucon takes care of all software and hardware updates, remotely updating software, resolving potential bugs and replacing and installing hardware on site
Compatible – The Ocucon portal is compatible with any web browser or computer, without the need for custom software or plug-ins, as well as being compatible with iOS, Android, and Win8 apps

Get in touch today to arrange a demo of Cloud by Ocucon.

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Implementing Total Retail Loss https://ocucon.com/how-to-implement-the-total-retail-loss-model/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=how-to-implement-the-total-retail-loss-model https://ocucon.com/how-to-implement-the-total-retail-loss-model/#respond Thu, 23 Jan 2020 09:45:37 +0000 https://ocucon.com/?p=2387 How to Implement the Total Retail Loss Model This is a follow on post from our previous blog post, found here. In this blog post, we will discuss how to measure the value of retail loss as outlined in Professor Adrian Beck’s Total Retail Loss typology. We will discuss many of the categories of [...]

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How to Implement the Total Retail Loss Model

This is a follow on post from our previous blog post, found here. In this blog post, we will discuss how to measure the value of retail loss as outlined in Professor Adrian Beck’s Total Retail Loss typology. We will discuss many of the categories of loss and provide actionable solutions for loss prevention and analysis.

Measuring the Value of Retail Loss

Beck’s Typology outlines a much more thorough definition of loss than just the loss of merchandise. It is important, therefore, to identify how each category of loss will be measured. There are three types of loss to be valued: Assets, Cash, and Margin.

Assets include things like merchandise, buildings, and vehicles. Examples of cash loss include; payments for fraudulently returned stock, cash lost or stolen from stores, cash paid to cover any regulatory or non-compliance fines, and payments for workers’ compensation claims and other general liabilities. Examples of margin loss includes; credit card charge backs, voucher scams, loyalty card abuse, customer fraud, and lost profit from out of stock merchandise.

Malicious Store Loss

The category malicious store loss includes several sub-categories:

– External Theft: measured by the value at cost price of any stock that is known to have been stolen by a third (external) party. Measure: Cost. Form of Loss : Asset
– Internal Theft: measured by the value at cost price of any stock that has been identified as stolen by employees of the company. Measure: Cost. Form of Loss: Asset
– Customer Fraud: there are a range of frauds that can be committed by customers. These include and are measured by; Returns Fraud (calculated as the full retail value of the goods), Credit/ Gift Card Frauds (calculated as cost price of goods), and Stolen Credit/ Bank Cards (calculated as the full retail value of the goods). Measure: Cost & Retail Value. Form of Loss: Asset, Cash, and Margin.
– Cash Theft: measured by the total value of stolen cash where the loss is known and malicious. Measure: Cost. Form of Loss: Cash.
– Burglary, Criminal Damage and Arson: measured by the total value of each of these incidents. Measure: Cost. Form of Loss: Asset.

Non-Malicious Corporate Loss

The category non-malicious corporate loss includes the following sub-categories:

– Workers Compensation: measured by the value of all incidents whereby the retailer is liable to compensate for any employment related injury. Form of Loss: Cash
– General Liabilities: measured by the value of all liabilities paid to customers and any other third party. Form of Loss: Cash
– Regulatory Fines: measured by the value of all payments made for fines related to breaches in regulatory compliance. This also includes any other instance where the company is found liable for payments related to unsatisfactory activities or behaviour. Form of Loss: Cash

Calculating Total Retail Loss

It is likely that the retail industry will adopt the Total Retail Loss Typology for bench-marking in the near future. However, Beck notes that it is unlikely that many companies will want to share such a high level of detail with others. Beck views his model as useful as a tool for individual companies to gain an improved understanding of their own picture of loss and how best to respond to it. He then explains that when calculating Retail Loss, it is up to the individual company to decide how to best quantify this figure. For instance, it might happen that the value of the sum of all of the categories of loss can be calculated as a percentage of overall turnover or as a proportion of overall profit generated.

A real value of Total Retail Loss is in understanding how the 33 categories of loss correlate with each other as a proportion of the total loss to the business. Businesses should look at the main drivers of loss and evaluate how their resources might be better allocated to deal with loss.

Actionable Retail Intelligence

Retail Loss Prevention Teams are well regarded for their problem solving skills. Beck recommends that LP Teams be given a challenge to address a wider range of retail losses. Cloud by Ocucon provides LP Teams with actionable long-term data which enhances problem solving.

Adopting the Total Retail Loss typology improves business decision making. In particular, businesses are able to more effectively evaluate retail investments. In order to do this, business need high quality data. Cloud by Ocucon removes physical limitations on the amount of surveillance footage a retailer can save, enabling the retailer to take a long-term view of both sales and losses so as to prevent loss-making cross functional exchanges.

Cloud by Ocucon provides loss prevention teams with actionable long-term data which enhances problem solving and helps LP investigate a wider range of retail loss.

Finally, the impact of TRL is assessed over the long-term. Cloud by Ocucon provides long-term evidence, as opposed to data being traditionally stored over the short-term. Ocucon supports every data point behind retail loss. The retailer simply logs-in to the Ocucon portal and is able to take a long-term analysis and view of losses and any evidence. To learn more about Cloud by Ocucon, contact us today.

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Adopting the Total Retail Loss Model for Improved Loss Prevention https://ocucon.com/adopting-the-total-retail-loss-model/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=adopting-the-total-retail-loss-model https://ocucon.com/adopting-the-total-retail-loss-model/#respond Wed, 22 Jan 2020 16:42:57 +0000 https://ocucon.com/?p=2381 The Total Retail Loss Report by Professor Adrian Beck, provides the retail industry with a more effective understanding of retail loss. The report begins by laying out why the traditionally used term, “shrinkage” is too narrow. It then develops a more in-depth concept, called “Total Retail Loss.” The study is based on interviews with [...]

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The Total Retail Loss Report by Professor Adrian Beck, provides the retail industry with a more effective understanding of retail loss. The report begins by laying out why the traditionally used term, “shrinkage” is too narrow. It then develops a more in-depth concept, called “Total Retail Loss.” The study is based on interviews with 100 senior retail leaders from some of the largest retailers in the US (report can be found here).

This blog post will discuss the findings of this report and highlight areas of the Total Retail Loss model which are impacted by Cloud by Ocucon.

Why This Report

A goal of Beck’s study is to develop a new definition of retail loss that is appropriate for the 21st Century retailing environment.

The report provides an in-depth study of the associated costs and losses of being a retailer. The report suggests that through adapting the Total Retail Loss model, retailers will be able to:

– better understand the impact of current and future retail risks

-make better informed decisions about the utilisation and allocation of increasingly scarce resources

-Loss prevention professionals are provided insight into how they can become “agents of change” within their role

Defining Loss vs Costs in the Total Retail Loss Context

An example of a potential loss for a retailer is workers’ compensation. The employer covers the medical, legal, and other costs associated with an accident at work. Such an event impacts negatively on a retailer’s overall profitability. Beck emphasises that where there’s a clear link between an activity and the generation of retail income, then it should be classified as a cost. An event is classified as a loss when there is no link between such activities.

Categorising Total Retail Loss

Beck advises to draw a distinction between the types of loss that can be measured, and measured in a way that is manageable for the business, and those types of losses that cannot be manageably measured.

Businesses should determine whether types of loss meet Beck’s “3 M’s test” (is it Manageable, Measurable and Meaningful?).

Beck’s Total Retail Loss Model begins by identifying the two types of losses incurred by retailers- the known and the unknown. Beck then classifies Known Losses as either malicious or non malicious.

Malicious known losses are those that are carried out with the intention of
depriving an organisation of goods, services, cash, and ultimately profit. Non malicious known losses occur within and between organisations that cause loss unintentionally. It is important to know if a loss was intentional or unintentional in order to address such losses and ultimately find a solution.

The Four Centres of Loss

Store: Losses that occur in the physical buildings owned or rented by a retailer where customers purchase goods. Also, E-commerce activities may be take place here for instance shipping of inventory, customer pickups and product returns.
Retail Supply Chain: Losses that occur across the entire supply chain process (manufacture, transportation and storage)
E-Commerce: Losses related to the provision of goods and services provided through the retailer’s e-commerce, internet based store.
Corporate: Losses which are related to the broader activities of the business.

The Total Retail Loss Model

The Typology is designed to enable the ‘value’ of retail losses to be calculated and not necessarily the number of events / the Typology is recording the value of retail losses and not their prevalence.

Total retail loss model

The Total Retail Loss Typology, by Professor Adrian Beck. source

The Evolving Role of Loss Prevention

Beck’s Total Retail Loss report concludes with recommendations for loss prevention professionals.

After identifying all forms of loss, Beck advises the business to review how their resources are currently being allocated and whether they might allocate their resources differently.

The overall goal, according to Beck, is for your business to achieve a level of loss that optimises the profitability of your business. Loss prevention professionals could seize the opportunity to take on new challenges that more effectively use their established skill set.

Beck sees the future of loss prevention teams as “drivers of a Total Retail Loss Group.” This would involve mobilising data on losses across the business, using problem solving skills to aid the business in selling more by more effectively managing losses, and coaching and mentoring other retail functions on effective Total Retail Loss tactics. It is in this way that Beck predicts loss prevention professionals can remain a crucial, responsive, and highly valued function in today’s dynamic retail environment.

By taking a ‘big’ picture view of loss across the entire retail environment, Adrian Beck’s Total Retail Loss model offers a useful tool for loss prevention teams to better understand how loss impacts profitability and how resources might be more effectively allocated.

In the retail environment, Cloud by Ocucon can help your loss prevention programme tackle losses in the Store and Corporate environment. Get in touch today to learn more about our solution.

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Is GPDR the Next PPI? https://ocucon.com/is-gpdr-the-next-ppi/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=is-gpdr-the-next-ppi https://ocucon.com/is-gpdr-the-next-ppi/#respond Wed, 22 Jan 2020 16:33:06 +0000 https://ocucon.com/?p=2377 Did you know that individuals have the right to seek compensation if an organisation fails to comply with GDPR?  Did you also know that complaints about CCTV activity is one of the top three complaints since GDPR came into force? - This represents a new risk to business which will create a huge pressure [...]

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Did you know that individuals have the right to seek compensation if an organisation fails to comply with GDPR? 

Did you also know that complaints about CCTV activity is one of the top three complaints since GDPR came into force?

This represents a new risk to business which will create a huge pressure to comply with the GDPR.

Independent insurtech company Auger believes GDPR could be the new PPI in terms of claims for misuse of customer data (source). Companies could face a genuine claims case where there has been negligence and damaging effects of misuse by the company of an individual’s data.

Lawyers who specialise in bringing cases seeking damages for personal injury will want to maximise such claims under GDPR just as many have done with PPI (source). According to some, there is always the risk of a malevolent co-ordinated mass request to put a company’s operations under pressure. Furthermore, claims companies that are looking for ways to stay solvent as the window for making PPI claims comes to an end could see this as an opportunity (source). PPI claims have cost the banking industry around £30m-£50m a year. Under GDPR, we could see similar figures if companies are not prepared for the changes when they come in.

Comprehensive Compliance is Essential

Your company should of course be demonstrating compliance with GDPR. This can be done by showing that you have taken steps to comply, such as by conducting a data audit to ensure you have the correct record keeping in place. You should be aware that you must respond within 30 days to an information request. Having the processes in place to enable your team to do this is crucial. 

What if your organisation receives an information request for CCTV footage? Do you have the process in place should this occur? Under GDPR, your must blur, or redact, sensitive third party information, even on video footage. Your organisation should have access to video redaction technology that is quick, cost-effective, and easy to use. One such solution is Pixelate by Ocucon: https://ocucon.com/pixelate/  

Pixelate by Ocucon is web-based, meaning no computing resource is used up while processing video, enabling other work to be carried out without reducing your employees’ performance. Pixelate’s pricing model allows you to purchase only what you need and it has an easy to use interface requiring very little training. With full UK support and listed on the Government Digital Marketplace, Pixelate should be every organisation’s go-to solution for GDPR compliant CCTV. 

Your organisation must also ensure that all aspects of its video surveillance programme is GDPR compliant. For tips on this matter, we urge you to read this blog post: https://ocucon.com/are-you-gdpr-ready/

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Are You GDPR Ready? https://ocucon.com/are-you-gdpr-ready/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=are-you-gdpr-ready https://ocucon.com/are-you-gdpr-ready/#respond Wed, 22 Jan 2020 15:33:09 +0000 https://ocucon.com/?p=2369 GDPR was implemented across the UK and the EU on the 25th May 2018. Is your organisation now fully compliant? A recent study found that 56% of respondents said that their organisations are not yet fully compliant with GDPR. The respondents rated the regulations of GDPR by difficulty. According to respondent ranking, the most [...]

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GDPR was implemented across the UK and the EU on the 25th May 2018. Is your organisation now fully compliant?

A recent study found that 56% of respondents said that their organisations are not yet fully compliant with GDPR. The respondents rated the regulations of GDPR by difficulty. According to respondent ranking, the most difficult aspects of GDPR to implement were; the right to be forgotten, fulfilling data subject access requests, and getting explicit consent from users. 

In this blog post, we will focus on all things GDPR and video surveillance. We’ll also provide solutions for compliance, as compiled by Televigil, a leading security and compliance consultant. 

Introduction to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and Video Surveillance

Last year, on the 25th of May, the GDPR came into force. GDPR regulates how organisations handle and process personal data. In the context of video surveillance, examples of personal data include images captured by automatic number plate recognition systems (ANPR), body worn cameras (BWC) and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) or drones. 

The ICO is the enforcement body in the UK, and have the power to fine businesses in the event of a breach of GDPR. Fines can be up to £17 million or 4% of global annual turnover, so it’s crucial that businesses put in place solutions for regulatory requirements.

Video Surveillance System Regulations

The impact of GDPR has been felt across industries as increasing fines are being imposed by the ICO. Any organisation or individual operating a video surveillance system is classified as a Data Controller or Data Processor and as such have a legal responsibility. As a Data Controller, your business must be able to justify the collection and use of personal data via a video surveillance system.

It is important for your business to review your use of existing video surveillance systems. When compliance planning, Televigil advise that the fundamental premise should be “accountability through transparency.” 

6 Areas to Review to Ensure GDPR Compliance

  1. Is Video Surveillance justified?

         Before purchasing a video surveillance system, your business should complete a Security Risk Assessment to determine if this is justified and the best solution. Your business should also complete a Data Privacy Impact Assessment. If you’re a commercial or public organisation, you should complete a Data Protection Impact Assessment. 

Under GDPR, the location of video surveillance cameras is important. For instance, it would be justifiable to place cameras around the perimeter of your site for the purpose of detecting intruders. In retail stores for instance, placing cameras in the store for the purpose of detecting crime can be justified under a security risk assessment. 

An example of where justification is needed for video surveillance is in a scenario in which you might be capturing images where someone would expect privacy. A detailed Operational Requirement (OR) is an essential document for both new and existing video surveillance systems as it provides details that are a benchmark to enable the business to monitor the system’s performance and provide justification for continued operation. 

A security and compliance consultant can help you carry out a security risk assessment of individual camera locations, intended view areas, purpose and justification for the camera(s), a privacy impact assessment, and an audit of an existing video surveillance system. 

  1. Transparency and Knowledge Sharing

        It’s important to be transparent and inform the public about what you / your business is doing and why. For example, a detail operational policy outlining the use of video surveillance and providing information on procedures for the system operator to employees. Signage is required that inform the public that a video surveillance system is in use. Now a legal requirement under GDPR, this signage must have the purpose and contact number for the business so that anyone wishing to make an enquiry can do so. 

A security and compliance consultant can carry out an inspection of your new or existing site and assist with appropriate signage design and location. It’s advisable to have a video surveillance system policy document that complies with BS 7958:2015 CCTV Management and operations code of practice. 

  1. Data Controllers must show justification for storing, retaining, and processing data in a secure manner

        If your business feels it is justified to retain video surveillance data for longer than 30 days, then you must state the reasons in a risk assessment. Many businesses find it necessary to store surveillance data in the cloud for an unlimited period of time to defend against fraudulent injury/insurance claims. 

  1. Respond to Data Subject Access Requests (DSAR)

        Per Article 15 of the GDPR; “Any person whose image is recorded on a Video Surveillance System has a right to seek and be supplied with a copy of their own personal data from the footage.” This means that any person who is captured by your surveillance system and can be seen has the right to request that footage as it is their personal data. This is known as a Data Subject Access Request (DSAR) and must be responded to within 30 days. If any other individuals are visible in the footage, they must be obscured or redacted in order to protect their identity. This also includes vehicle number plates and any sensitive documents/information visible in the footage. 

A redaction service, like Ocucon Pixelate will enable you to redact video to comply with DSARs. To learn more about Pixelate, click here

  1. Provide the Police with access to relevant video surveillance images 

        An occasion might arise where the police will request footage from you. You can supply this, but you must ensure that the request is made in written format on appropriate police letterhead with the correct forms. A request from the police to view footage on your business premises should not raise any concern regarding data protection as long as the correct procedures are followed. 

A security and compliance consultant can provide your business with log books, viewing documentation, and evidential download documentation. 

  1. Ensure compliance with GDPR and other legislation

         If using a security service provider, it is possible they will be classified as a Data Processor under GDPR. As a video surveillance operator (Data Controller), your business must have in place a contract that details what the Data Processor may do with the data, security standards that should be in place and any verification procedures. This contract is important as it sets out both parties responsibilities and liabilities pertaining to GDPR and data protection. 

When choosing a security service provider, ensure that they comply with GDPR. This must include regular review of video surveillance system performance, policy and procedures. They must notify you, the Data Controller, immediately of any potential issues or non-compliance. It’s advisable to have in place a Video Surveillance System Operational Policy and Procedures document, which would form part of the contract between the Data Controller and the Data Processor.

In conclusion, a security and compliance consultancy have a solid understanding of the security industry, DPA, and GDPR. It’s important to choose a consultancy that is up to date with the evolving guidance provided by the ICO and other relevant authorities. 

As it has been one year since GDPR came into force, it’s imperative that all organisations evaluate their security programme and ensure that there’s no likely breaches of regulations. Complacency or oversight of GDPR could result in serious financial penalty and damage to your business reputation. 

The latest information and guidance is available on the ICO website: https://ico.org.uk/

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What Your Business Needs to Know About Slip and Fall Accidents https://ocucon.com/what-business-needs-to-know-slip-fall-accidents/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=what-business-needs-to-know-slip-fall-accidents https://ocucon.com/what-business-needs-to-know-slip-fall-accidents/#respond Wed, 22 Jan 2020 15:16:01 +0000 https://ocucon.com/?p=2365 25,000 slips and fall accidents occur every day in the U.S. In reality, this figure is larger - for every person who reports an injury from a fall, there’s another three people who have fallen but don’t report it (source). A prevention measure commonly used by management is to implement a safety plan for [...]

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25,000 slips and fall accidents occur every day in the U.S. In reality, this figure is larger – for every person who reports an injury from a fall, there’s another three people who have fallen but don’t report it (source). A prevention measure commonly used by management is to implement a safety plan for workers. In this blog post, we will discuss why implementing a fully managed, video surveillance system should be a key component of your business’ slip and fall prevention strategy.

Slips and falls are the second leading accidental cause of fatalities in the U.S. (motor vehicle accidents are number one) (source). Unsafe conditions and a general unawareness of potential risks are two major factors that contribute to slip and fall accidents (source).

Furthermore, slip and fall accidents are costly:

  • 85% of worker’s compensation claims are attributed to employees slipping on slick floors (source).
  • 22% of slip and fall incidents resulted in more than 31 days away from work (US Bureau of Labor Statistics 2002).
  • Compensation & medical costs associated with slip and fall accidents in the U.S. is approximately $70 billion annually (National Safety Council Injury Facts 2003 edition).
  • The average cost of a slip and fall accident is $22,800 (or £17,700)
  • Fraudulent slip and falls claims culture costs business in the UK more than half a billion per year (source).
  • Customer walkways are a major problem area: Only 31 percent of respondents reported placing floor mats in customer walkways, although nearly one in four (24 percent) experienced falls in those area (source).

If a slip and fall accident occurs in your place of business, you could have a difficult time defending your operations if due diligence has not been carried out in providing a safe environment for customers and employees. In order to effectively protect employee and customers, slip and fall prevention must be viewed holistically – when evaluating floor safety, business should take an entire-facility view. For instance, perform walkway audits and produce safety planograms to help mitigate risks. Should a slip and fall accident occur and your business faces litigation, having a clear video recording of the event will be highly advantageous. It’s a good idea, therefore, for businesses to securely store their video surveillance data in the cloud.

Ocucon is the world’s first Video Surveillance as a Service (VSaaS) system. We provide unlimited secure cloud storage for an unlimited number of cameras. Users of the Ocucon portal have the flexibility to store uncapped amounts of data for as long as required. This revolutionises the way in which business settle valid slip and fall claims, as it provides a simple claims management solution.

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How to Ensure Your Organisation’s CCTV System is ICO Compliant https://ocucon.com/ico-compliant-cctv-system/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ico-compliant-cctv-system https://ocucon.com/ico-compliant-cctv-system/#respond Wed, 22 Jan 2020 15:05:17 +0000 https://ocucon.com/?p=2358 This blog post will help you ensure your CCTV system is ICO compliant; including the installation, management, operation, public awareness and signage of your organisation’s CCTV system.  - Step 1: Installation Perform a data protection impact assessment. Your business should identify and document any possible impact on individuals’ privacy. You must take this into [...]

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This blog post will help you ensure your CCTV system is ICO compliant; including the installation, management, operation, public awareness and signage of your organisation’s CCTV system. 

Step 1: Installation

Perform a data protection impact assessment. Your business should identify and document any possible impact on individuals’ privacy. You must take this into account when installing and operating a CCTV system. A regular review must be conducted to assess whether CCTV is still the best security solution. 

Once you have determined the purpose for which your business will be processing personal data, you must pay the ICO a data protection fee unless you are exempt. If your business uses non-domestic CCTV systems, it is likely that you will need to pay a fee. There are three different tiers of fee; between £40 and £2,900. The fee depends on the size of your business, your turnover and, in some situations, the type of business you are. If you would like more information on this, the ICO has published more detailed guidance on their website.

Step 2: Management

Governance: Your business has a policy and/or procedure covering the use of CCTV and has appointed an individual who is responsible for the operation of the CCTV system. The policy should cover the purposes for which you are using CCTV and how you will use this information, including guidance on recording and disclosures. 

Requests for personal data: Your business has developed a process to recognise and reply to individuals or organisations requesting copies of the images on your CCTV footage and to promptly seek guidance from the Information Commissioner if there is any uncertainty. Your organisation must be aware of people’s right to request a copy of their image and be prepared to handle such requests. In many instances, any images of any present third parties in the CCTV footage must be redacted – this can be done quickly through a software product such as Pixelate by Ocucon (learn more on our website: https://ocucon.com/pixelate/). 

Training: Ensure that all relevant staff are aware of your CCTV policy and procedures, and train them where necessary.

Step 3: Operation

Retention: Your business should retain data for the minimum time that is necessary for its purpose and dispose of it appropriately when no longer required. The ICO’s guidance on retention period of data is that this time frame should reflect how long your business needs the data for its purposes. Furthermore, the ICO advises that your business should undertake systematic checks in order to ensure compliance with the retention period in practice. The ICO notes that long retention periods can affect the quality of the footage with modern cameras recording to hard disks. However, if your business is storing CCTV footage on a secure cloud platform like Cloud by Ocucon, this will not be a concern. 

Data Quality: Your business should ensure that the CCTV images are clear and of a high quality. You should select a system which produces high quality, clear images. The ICO advises that you should situate your CCTV cameras in the best location possible to ensure that they provide clear images.

Data Security: Your business should ensure that CCTV images are securely stored, access is limited to only authorised individuals, and that checks are regularly carried out on the CCTV system to ensure it is working properly. 

Step 4: Public awareness and signage

Your business should clearly inform individuals of your use of CCTV. This can be done by displaying signs in clear view that show that CCTV is in operation. Where applicable, you should also outline the use of CCTV and its purposes on your company’s website. 

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